St. Cloud State University

Course Equivalents

Course Equivalents for PHIL 194 at St. Cloud State University in Fall 2021 (Aug - Dec)



While all courses listed as equivalents below are transferable, they are not necessarily equivalent in both directions. The courses below transfer TO the college or university shown above. To see how courses from your home college or university transfer to other participating colleges or universities, you can search Transferology.

If you are enrolling in the equivalent course in order to fulfill a program/major requirement, it is best to check with your academic advisor to ensure that the equivalent course will meet the requirements of your particular major.

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Anoka-Ramsey Community College

PHIL 1105 - Introduction to Logic and Critical Reasoning - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Critical Thinking (02)
(MnTC Goals 2 and 4) This course introduces students to the philosophical study of reasoning. Studies include the function and uses of language, the distinction between deductive and inductive arguments, methods for symbolizing and evaluating the validity of deductive arguments, and the detection of informal fallacies. Students will gain practical skills used in the evaluation of inductive and deductive arguments.
Section Availability

Bemidji State University

PHIL 2230 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Methods of distinguishing between correct and incorrect reasoning. Special emphasis on deductive reasoning and informal fallacies. Liberal Education Goal Area 4.
Section Availability

Central Lakes College

PHIL 1421 - Critical Thinking - 3 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
Communication (01)
This philosophy course helps students develop analytical and reasoning skills that will permit them to more effectively understand and discern the logical content of various types of persuasive communication, which will empower them to: 1) defend themselves from deceptive arguments and attempts to persuade, as well as 2) to more precisely clarify and evaluate their own thoughts, beliefs, values and goals. Students will learn about uses and misuses of language, common cognitive errors, recognition and formal analysis of good and bad arguments, and how to articulate and critically assess moral implications of claims. MnTC Goals 1 and 2
Section Availability

Century College

PHIL 1041 - Introduction to Logic (Online) - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
This course introduces students to the formal study of reasoning using the concepts and techniques of symbolic logic. Topics covered include representing the underlying logical structure of English sentences and arguments, testing whether arguments have good form, identifying valid and invalid argument forms, and recognizing common examples of bad reasoning. While it can be abstract and challenging, learning symbolic logic does have its practical side: it may lead to a deeper appreciation of the uses and abuses of language, more careful and critical reading skills, and a better understanding of how to craft well-reasoned writing.
Section Availability

Dakota County Technical College

PHIL 1200 - Critical Thinking - 3 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
Human Diversity (07)
In this course, students will develop skills in the use of informal logic, argument evaluation, and language analysis for addressing problems found on the World Wide Web, in the workplace, and in other everyday environments. Students will address topics related to diversity, media literacy, and philosophy of science. Suggested Accuplacer reading cut score over 78. Meets MnTC Goals 2 and 7.
Section Availability
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INDS 1020 - Critical Thinking for Student Success - 2 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
This course introduces students to basic concepts in critical thinking that support ongoing accomplishment in a modern world. Students will address concepts relevant to criticism, point of view, communication, education, organization, and performance. This course is intended for students in their first or second semester at DCTC. This course meets MnTC Goal Area 2: Critical Thinking.
Section Availability

Hennepin Technical College

PHIL 2100 - Critical Thinking for College Success - 3 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
This course is an introduction to the study of reasoning and its applications to making good decisions and avoiding mental errors in the college environment. Students will investigate the logical concept of an 'argument' and focus on how supporting beliefs with evidence and sound reasoning leads to better positions, decisions, behaviors, and outcomes in college and in life. (Prereq: None) (BP/EP) 3 cr MnTC Goal Area 2
Section Availability

Hibbing Community College

PHIL 1250 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Introductory Logic introduces fundamentals of informal, traditional, symbolic, and inductive logic. The course requires the student to explore the different types of logic and apply those skills to critical thinking and problem solving. The student examines the uses of language in argumentation, the importance of definition, the place of fallacy in arguments, as well as the foundations of deductive logic, traditional or Aristotelian logic, symbolic or modern logic, and inductive logic. The course provides the student with the fundamentals of analytic reasoning providing the foundation for further logical study. Prerequisite: MATH0971 or equivalent. MNTC goal area:(4)Math and Logical Reasoning. PREREQUISITES: MATH 0971: Beginning Algebra or equivalent.
Section Availability

Inver Hills Community College

PHIL 1120 - Symbolic Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Critical Thinking (02)
Uses propositional and predicate calculus to study deductive reasoning via the symbolic languages of propositional and predicate logic. Examines basic logical concepts (validity, logical truth, contradiction, entailment, equivalence), the symbolization of arguments expressed in natural language, and evaluates them via truth tables, formal proofs, or truth trees. This course is ideal for students interested in computer science, engineering, mathematics, or in pursuing further studies in philosophy.
Section Availability

Lake Superior College

PHIL 1125 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
An introduction to Aristotelian logic and modern symbolic logic. Include formal predicate and sentential logic, induction, and methods of translation. MTC goal areas: (4) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning. (Prerequisites: College-level reading and writing and MATH0460, or equivalent, or 71 or higher on the Elementary Algebra portion of the CPT) (3 hrs lec/0 hrs lab/0 hrs OJT
Section Availability

Minneapolis Community and Technical College

PHIL 2110 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
This course is an introduction to the formal analysis of deductive reasoning using symbolic language. You will learn how to translate various types of written arguments into logical notation and how to evaluate the validity of these arguments using a variety of methods (e.g. truth tables, natural deduction, truth trees). The skills learned in this class will strengthen your analytic reasoning ability, which is applicable in fields such as law, mathematics, computer science, and philosophy. These skills are also transferable to the analytic reasoning portions of graduate and professional school entrance examinations.
Section Availability

Minnesota State University Moorhead

PHIL 110 - Practical Reasoning - 3 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
An introduction to critical thinking, with emphasis on understanding the logic of everyday arguments, interpreting the arguments of others, detecting fallacies, and constructing good arguments. MnTC Goal 2.
Section Availability

Minnesota State University, Mankato

PHIL 110 - Logic and Critical Thinking - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Critical Thinking (02)
Traditional syllogistic logic and an introduction to the elements of modern symbolic logic.
Section Availability

Minnesota West Community and Technical College

PHIL 1200 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Logic introduces students to formal and informal logic. Students will learn to identify and outline arguments in classic and contemporary texts, to determine whether an argument is deductive or inductive, and to determine an argument's validity and soundness. Students will learn to diagram categorical syllogisms and to translate propositional statements. Students will also learn to identify and classify logical fallacies. Prerequisite: ENGL 1101. This course counts as a Mathematical/Logical Reasoning course, Area 4.
Section Availability

Normandale Community College

PHIL 1102 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
This course is the study of the deductive analysis of arguments using the tools of contemporary symbolic logic. The course includes the examination of basic logical concepts (logical form, validity, logical truth, consistency), symbolization of arguments expressed in natural language, truth tables, formal proofs or truth trees, and elementary quantification theory.
Section Availability

North Hennepin Community College

PHIL 1110 - Informal Reasoning for Problem Solving - 3 credits
Ethical/Civic Resp (09)
Critical Thinking (02)
This course studies methods of problem solving, utilizing principles that distinguish good reasoning from poor reasoning. Students will evaluate claims and arguments in natural language, applying the concepts of validity, truth, induction, deduction, and relevance. Students will develop clear thinking, and recognize, criticize and avoid common fallacies. Conceptual analysis will be applied to areas of practical reasoning, to human values, to develop science and media literacy, and to further student self-awareness.
Section Availability
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PHIL 1050 - Introduction to Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Investigation of the principles of deductive and inductive reasoning. The course includes Aristotelian logic, propositional and symbolic logic, validity, invalidity, and proofs. Since this course can be taken to fulfill the Mathematical-Logical Reasoning general education requirement, students should expect a Math-like course, with exercises, and exams.
Section Availability

Riverland Community College

PHIL 1100 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Critical Thinking (02)
This course introduces the student to formal logical reasoning. Students learn how to translate sentences from a natural language into a formal logical language, and use truth-functional logic and natural deduction systems to prove validity. Additionally, students may study syllogistic logic, quantification theory, informal fallacies and/or principles of inductive reasoning pertaining to analogy, enumerative induction, and hypothesis testing. MnTC (Goals 4 M/A and 2C/T); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
Section Availability

Rochester Community and Technical College

PHIL 1145 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
This course is an introduction to the systematic study of reasoning and argumentation. Students will learn how informal and formal logic can be used to evaluate the strength or validity of arguments, especially ones drawn from ordinary language. They will also develop the capacities to recognize common fallacies, and to apply the methods of logic to problems of contemporary interest. While this course challenges students with abstract reasoning, the study of logic will demystify the underlying structure of language, highlight abuses of reason, teach the values of critical reading, and suggest strategies for formulating coherent, well-reasoned writing. (Prerequisites: None).
Section Availability

Saint Paul College

PHIL 1710 - Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Logic is the study of arguments. This course uses the tools of symbolic logic to explore logical concepts such as logical truth, consistency, equivalence, and validity. It introduces an artificial, symbolic language that can be used to test the logical properties of statements and arguments. These analytical skills support work in a range of activities that require clear, careful, step-by-step thinking. although this cores falls within the goal of mathematics, it may not apply to certain technical programs or meet certain transfer requirements for mathematics. (Prerequisite(s): READ 0722 or READ 0724 or EAPP 0900 with a grade of "C" or better or appropriate assessment score) (MnTC: Goal 4) 3C/3/0/0
Section Availability

South Central College

CRTK 100 - Critical Thinking - 3 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
This course helps students acquire and develop critical thinking skills. Focused on the practical application of the principles of good reasoning, it encourages them to cultivate cognitive virtues such as consistency, self-awareness, open-mindedness, fairness, and intellectual humility. Students will be taught how to: recognize (and make) good arguments, identify (and avoid) logical fallacies and cognitive biases, articulate ideas in a clear and precise way, understand the significance and limits of the scientific method, and critically evaluate sources in the media. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: 2 Critical Thinking)
Section Availability

St. Cloud Technical & Community College

CRTK 1300 - Introduction to Critical Thinking - First 8-weeks - 3 credits
Critical Thinking (02)
Meets MN Transfer Curriculum Goal Area 2 - Critical Thinking - Intro to Critical Thinking is a practical course in critical thinking. It develops monological and multilogical and ethical reasoning skills and explores creative and logical approaches to problem solving. It examines how our thinking skills affect our personal identities, our relationships with others, and our understanding of culture. It analyzes systems of ideas, multiple perspectives on issues, and differing analytical approaches. It develops the higher order thinking skills, intellectual values, and the qualities of thought important for personal integrity, academic success, and effective citizenship. Student Learning Outcomes: * Solve problems using creative thinking and logical reasoning. * Distinguish between facts, assumptions, inferences and implications in beliefs and arguments. * Apply effective problem solving techniques to monological and multilogical problems. * Apply strategies for reducing the effect of bias and prejudice on thinking. * Analyze the Elements of Thought (Purpose, Questions, Information, Inferences, Assumptions, Point of View, Concepts, and Implications) in decision making. * Apply ethical reasoning to problem solving situations. * Apply the Intellectual Virtues (Intellectual Humility, Empathy, Integrity, Courage, Autonomy, Perseverance and Confidence in Reason) to the evaluation of beliefs, arguments, and theories.
Section Availability
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PHIL 1340 - Introduction to Logic - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
Critical Thinking (02)
Meets MN Transfer Curriculum Goal Areas 2 and 4 - Critical Thinking and Mathematics. Logic is the study of correct reasoning. This course explores the principles of inductive and deductive reasoning, the structure of arguments, and methods for distinguishing between good reasoning and bad reasoning. The course includes traditional Aristotelian logic and modern symbolic logic, validity, invalidity, and proofs. Students will learn a variety of tools for proving validity in deductive arguments and for recognizing formal and informal fallacies in logical reasoning. Student Learning Outcomes: * Identify the components of an argument. * Demonstrate what constitutes a valid logical argument employing multiple analytical tools. * Apply higher-order problem solving strategies. * Translate arguments into standard categorical and syllogistic form. * Translate verbal statements into symbolic statements. * Differentiate between inductive and deductive arguments. * Recognize common logical fallacies in argumentation. * Determine immediate inferences.
Section Availability

Winona State University

PHIL 110 - Critical Thinking - 3 credits
Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (04)
This computer-assisted, self-mastery course teaches you how to employ good reasoning skills and how to avoid being fooled by bad reasoning and rhetorical tricks. Competencies acquired in the course include the following: Identifying, evaluating, and constructing arguments; identifying informal fallacies; testing syllogisms and propositional arguments for validity and overall cogency; and assessing and constructing position papers. Offered each semester. Meets GOAL 4.
Section Availability